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Tissue samples for research into pregnancy complications to be stored in the Newcastle

Tissue samples for research into pregnancy complications to be stored in the Newcastle

Contact phone number: Research Midwives Office Tel 0191 2820362

Why is this study important?

Most women have a straightforward pregnancy and deliver a healthy baby around their expected date.  Unfortunately some women miscarry.  Others go into labour and deliver early (preterm birth) or may develop problems with the placenta (afterbirth) they may develop high blood pressure or deliver babies that are smaller than expected.  These later problems in pregnancy can have a major impact on the health of the mother and/or her baby.

Researchers hope to improve the care women receive during their pregnancy in the future by understanding why things go wrong.

What is the aim of this study?

This study involves looking at cells from the uterus (womb), cervix and placenta (afterbirth) in order to understand how these cells work, what controls them and why these control mechanisms sometimes go wrong.  Researchers at Newcastle University are coordinating a local collection of tissue from samples from the uterus and placenta for use in several research projects to provide better care for women and improve pregnancy outcomes in the future.  The samples collected will be stored in the tissue bank and will represent a gift to the research team.  Tissue collected may be stored for many years before they are used and may also be used in more than one study in order to make the best use of these important samples.

What do people in this study have to do?

Women may be approached to take part in this study, they will be asked to donate tissue samples to the tissue bank.  Women will be given information about this study before their surgery.

Pregnant (not in labour – ELCS – Elective Lower Caesarean Section)

If a woman is having a caesarean section and has agreed to gift a tissue sample, during the surgery and after the baby has been delivered a small sample of tissue is collected from the muscle layer of the lower uterus (womb).  Samples may also be taken from the upper part of the uterus.  Women may also be asked to donate their placenta for research.

Pregnant (in labour – EMCS – Emergency Lower Caesarean Section)

Due to problems in labour some women will need to deliver their baby by caesarean section.  If this is the case tissue samples may be taken during the operation, after the delivery of the baby, from the same opening used the deliver the baby small tissue sample will be collected from the muscle layer of the lower uterus (womb).  Samples may also be collected from the upper part of the uterus. Two small samples may be taken from the cervix (neck of the womb), these will be collected at the end of the operation.  Women may also be asked to donate their placenta for research.

Early pregnant ( Surgical Termination of Pregnancy)

All tissue samples will be taken whilst the woman is asleep and at the end of the operation.

Non pregnant (hysterectomy)

Some women attending for a hysterectomy may be approached to take part in research.  The collection of tissue will be carried out after the uterus (womb) has been removed and will not interfere with any examination.  Three or four samples of tissue will be taken, each about the size of a pea, from the muscle layer and neck of the uterus (cervix).

What are the risks and benefits for women taking part in this research study?

There will not be any direct benefit for women taking part in this study but the information that is gained from the researchers will help pregnant women in the future.

Collecting the samples will add no more than a couple of minutes to the operation and will not affect your recovery in any way.

If any evidence of disease is found in the research samples, the clinical team for the woman will be made aware and they will be able to advise the most appropriate management.

Clinical Trials in Reproductive Health and Childbirth

Select a trial from the list below to find out more about what it’s all about and how you can get involved in helping others.

Pluripotency, reprogramming and mitochondrial biology

This research aims to improve fertility treatment in the future and also help to find cures for many serious illnesses and diseases.

Uteroplacental Tissue Bank.

This study involves looking at cells from the uterus (womb), cervix and placenta (afterbirth) in order to understand how these cells work, what controls them and why these control mechanisms sometimes go wrong.

DAPPA

This study aims to find the best method for measuring the amount of protein in the urine to predict diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and how serious the condition is for women.

Reproductive health and childbirth publications from our region

Here you can access journal articles from research carried out here in our region

PRE-EMPT

A large randomised controlled trial in which women undergoing surgery for endometriosis will be randomly allocated to take long acting progestogens. The trial will provide information on which treatment is the most effective in terms of symptom relief, side-effects, acceptability and costs.

CONCEPTT

CONCEPTT: Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Women with Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy Trial


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